September is National Recovery Month

admin September 8, 2016


National Recovery Month

National Recovery Month is recognized every September. It is a national observance help to increase awareness of mental and/or substance use disorders, celebrate individuals in long-term recovery, and acknowledge the work of prevention, treatment, and recovery services. The lives of millions of Americans have been transformed through recovery, but these successes will often go unnoticed by the public. Recovery month aims to celebrate those making health transformations.

Throughout Recovery Month participants work to educate Americans about substance use treatments and mental health services, and how they can enable those with a mental and/or substance use disorder to live a healthy and rewarding life. Recovery Month highlights the achievements of individuals who have reclaimed their lives in long-term recovery, honors the treatment and recovery service providers who make recovery possible, and promotes the message that recovery in all of its forms is possible through the availability of proper prevention, treatment, and recovery services.

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services releases the National Survey on Drug Use and Health every September. This survey is the primary source of information on the prevalence and impact of mental and/or substance use disorders nationwide. Some of these recently released statistics have been included below:

    • By 2020, mental and substance use disorders will surpass all physical diseases as a major cause of disability worldwide.
    • More than 7.9 million U.S. adults reported having co-occurring disorders. This means that in the past year they have had any mental illness and a substance use disorder.
    • Research shows that family supports play a major role in helping to prevent mental and/or substance use disorders, identifying when someone has a problem, and connecting those in need with treatment resources and services.
    • The percentage of adults who had co-occurring mental illness and substance use disorder in the past year was highest among adults aged 18 to 25, at nearly 30%.
    • Among people aged 12 or older, 21.5 million people (8.1 percent of this population) were classified with substance dependence or abuse in the past year.
    • Among adults aged 18 or older, 43.6 million (18.1 percent of adults) had any mental illness in the past year.

 

If you would like to learn more about National Recovery Month or how you can get involved, and to find local events, please visit www.recoverymonth.gov.

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